News Headlines
Fri. Sep 11th 2020
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Members of the department gathered today with local leaders and members of the community to remember and reflect on the tragic events of 9/11. While it is hard to fathom the worst attack on American s...
Tue. Sep 1st 2020
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A few photos from Retired Firefighter Albert Ash's Memorial Service. Ladder companies from West Reading Fire Company and Blandon Fire Company set up an arch for the funeral procession. Photos by T...
Tue. Sep 1st 2020
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Congratulations to Firefighter Steven Johnson on his retirement after 40 years of service to the City of Reading. Following in his father's footsteps a young Steven Johnson joined Explorer Post 29...
Tue. Sep 1st 2020
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ORDER#NameCurrent PositionNew PositionEffective Date2020-18Nathan MoyerMedic 1 "D"Medic 3 "Driver"8.12.20202020-19Daniel WasselMedic 2 Driver "A"Jumper "A"8.18....
Wed. Aug 26th 2020
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Our condolences to the family of Alber Ash Sr. on his recent passing. Al retired from Engine 9 in December of 1993. ViewingMonday, August 31st 6 pm to 9 pmBean Funeral Home, 1605 Rockland Street Fun...
Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Each year in America, carbon monoxide poisoning claims hundreds of lives and sends another 10,000 people to hospital emergency rooms for treatment. There are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from deadly carbon monoxide fumes.

What is carbon monoxide?

CO is an odorless, colorless and poisonous gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

Where does carbon monoxide come from?

CO gas can come from several sources: gas-fired appliances, charcoal grills, wood-burning furnaces or fireplaces and motor vehicles.

Who is at risk?

Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Medical experts believe that unborn babies, infants, children, senior citizens and people with heart or lung problems are at even greater risk for CO poisoning.

What You Can Do To Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

Install at least one UL (Underwriters Laboratories) listed Carbon Monoxide Detector with an audible warning signal near the sleeping areas and outside individual bedrooms. Carbon Monoxide Detectors measure levels of CO over time and are designed to sound an alarm before an average, healthy adult would experience symptoms. It is very possible that you may not be experiencing symptoms when you hear the alarm. This does not mean that CO is not present.

Have a qualified professional check all fuel burning appliances, furnaces, venting and chimney systems at least once a year.

Never use your range or oven to help heat your home and never use a charcoal grill in your home or garage.

Never keep a car running in a garage. Even if the garage doors are open, normal circulation will not provide enough fresh air to reliably prevent a dangerous buildup of Carbon Monoxide.

From "Exposing an Invisible Killer A Factsheet on the Dangers of Carbon Monoxide" by The United States Fire Administration.

Install Carbon Monoxide Detectors in your home!


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